“Trim” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 20

I think my poems for Tupelo Press’s 30/30 Project have taken a domestic turn!  Today’s poem, Trim, arose out of some of my landscaping chores this summer.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

Advertisements

“Renovation” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 19

Today’s poem “Renovation” is something that has grown out of notes and writing I made back last April, which is why it reads more like a spring than late summer poem.  This late into my poetry project, I am more and more grateful for all those piles of notebooks full of scribbling that I can draw from when I don’t have any fresh ideas!

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“A Promise, After,” and “The Hidden Life”, Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Days 17 & 18

Sunday, August 17th’s poem, “A Promise, After” is another poem that I worked on during the Glen Workshop, and is based on writing I did earlier this summer. My biggest challenge in poetry is its form which, ironically, is the aspect of poetry which distinguishes it from other creative writing.  I’m working toward writing more often in stanzas and pushing toward interesting line breaks. I can tell that this has been an area of growth for me over the past few months even.

Monday, August 18th’s poem is called The Hidden Life, and I worked on this poem being broken down by 10-syllable unrhymed lines, i.e. “blank verse.”

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

An Occasional Poem, “White”, Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 14

An “occasional poem” is a poem written in honor or memory of a particular occasion. (Duh)  Since late yesterday afternoon when I first heard about the arrest of journalists and the use of military weapons on protestors in Ferguson, Missouri, I have been caught up in the reports.  It is difficult to believe that the images I’m seeing come from 2014 and not 1964, although I know that nothing about this episode is surprising to people in black communities.  With these images weighing on my heart, and a desire to bring this wrestling into my work, I tried to work on the next poem in my “Invention of Color” series.  This one, “White” is in the form of a Bop, which is a recently created form in which stanzas of 6 – 8 – 6 lines are interrupted by a repeated refrain.  Afaa Michael Weaver introduced the form at an African American arts event, which is why I wanted to try to use it for this particular topic.  If I had more time, this would be quite a bit better, I’m sure, but it was a good challenge to work on something that is complex emotionally and technically, as well as politically current.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Tyrian Purple” and “Ochre” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Days 12 & 13

Today’s poem, Tyrian Purple, is, how shall I say it, a little ambitious! I am really enjoying this Invention of Color theme that has come about the past week, thanks to the podcast from Stuff You Missed In History Class.  I think I probably had about 20 browser tabs open in the process of writing this poem! I am grateful for a father-in-law who was able to come play with my kiddo for a few hours this morning so I could get back on track with my writing.

Yesterday’s poem, Ochre, is not my favorite, but I needed simply to put it out there and move on.  Such is the nature of this project.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Cento, with head cold” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 11

Eleven days into this poetry project I have been struck by a sniffly, achy head cold — not to mention that I spent eight hours yesterday navigating gas-station panhandlers and flood advisories on I-25 coming back from Santa Fe.  I’m sure my marathon-running friends can tell me stories of the difficulty of the middle third part of a race, which is where I’m at in this writing project.  I almost didn’t submit anything today because I want to take the time to do justice to the next poem in my “Invention of Color” series, neither do I want to interrupt it.

Instead, I put together a “Cento.”  I won’t say I wrote a Cento because it is a form in which each line is taken from another existing poem.  This one “Cento, with head cold” is created exclusively from lines taken from books that I bought at the Glen Workshop (with the exception of the first line, which is my favorite line from Emily Dickinson to quote when I’m experiencing writer’s block). I owe a debt of foggy,cold-meds gratitude to Karen An-Hwei Lee who made me aware of this form when she included a beautiful one in her reading at Glen this past Thursday.  Karen’s was lovingly knit together with lines from poems written by students in her workshop and it was very warmly received.  I’ll return to my color series tomorrow, but for now, I need some rest!

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“The Invention of Color: Tekhelet” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 10

Today’s poem, The Invention of Color: Tekhelet, is the second in a series of color poems I just started working on this week.  I got the idea from a episode of the podcast “Stuff You Missed In History,” which is completely delightful and always has interesting tidbits of story that make for poem subjects.  This process of daily writing and posting is both a good habit to develop and something of a chore at times!

I head home from Glen West today after a week devoted to artistic pursuit with like-minded people.  It was a major treat, but I really don’t think I want to read another poem again for awhile! I’m a bit tapped out on critique. 🙂  It’s a good reminder to realize that art is merely a part of life, a way of life, not something which can sustain complete focus all the time.  This is what I like about poem writing and reading – it can happen in the midst of the busyness of everyday things, but shed a new light on those things so that it elevates and sustains them.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!