The Final Week of the Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project

Well, I’m limping toward home plate, so to speak!  This month has been a great exercise in daily writing and revising (it hasn’t been such a great exercise in daily exercise, alas. I’ll need to get physical activity back into my routine!)  I hope you’re still reading along! Today’s poem is called Abstract Tree Forms, Emily Carr.

I’ve decided that this final week I’ll work on a series of poems using what is called ekphrasis.   Ekphrasis in its most basic definition takes the description of another work of (visual) art as its starting point.  This practice has a long history throughout literature dating from the Greeks up through Keat’s Ode on Grecian Urn and even, as my husband pointed out, in music – his example being Queen’s The Fairy-Feller’s Master-Stroke.

I have a massive collection of art postcards that I started collecting in college, and now I intentionally pick out one or two new postcards whenever I visit a new museum.  This gives me a lot of options for personally meaningful images to draw from.  I decided to write this first one from one of my oldest postcards, which I bought on a visit to the Vancouver art museum when I was visiting my friend Kelli at university there in the late nineties.  It was a neat moment because I had just read a Smithsonian magazine article about the artist, Emily Carr, and it just so happened that some of her masterworks were on display nearby at the time of my visit.  The postcard I picked up there has been up on many, many office and apartment walls since then, and it was fun to write about it these many years later.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Chores” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 23

Look, it’s a sonnet!  Well, today’s poem, Chores, at least resembles a sonnet even if its rhyme scheme isn’t the interlaced alternating rhymes that some of the more formal sonnets require.  I’m pleased nonetheless.  The first few lines of this one sprung into mind quite easily as I was making a pie for a friend’s “beer and pie” birthday party tonight, using the only fruit I had in the house (thank goodness blueberries were on sale this week).  I often get good ideas for writing while I cook, and I think the practices aren’t dissimilar.  For both, you have to use what you already have in the house, beware-ing exotic ingredients, and they often take longer than you think they will.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Midlife” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 22

Oops, it looks like I am just now remembering to post today’s Tupelo 30/30 project poem, Midlife.  This is what happens when my baby doesn’t take his morning nap, the whole routine goes out the window!  Seriously, though, I am feeling pretty heroic for even attempting to do this project while caring for a toddler. 🙂

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Coleman” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 21

I was at REI the other day and saw that those old Coleman propane lanterns I remember from my past have been mostly overshadowed by electric LED bulb lanterns.  This made me vaguely sad, which is where this poem, Coleman, came from.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Trim” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 20

I think my poems for Tupelo Press’s 30/30 Project have taken a domestic turn!  Today’s poem, Trim, arose out of some of my landscaping chores this summer.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!