Last Chance to Check Out my 30/30 Project Poems

It has been just over a week since finishing my daily poem-writing project with Tupelo Press’s 30/30 fundraiser.  I really enjoyed the process of writing on a regular schedule and putting new work before an audience of readers, however few. That said, I breathed a sigh of relief when September arrived and I no longer found myself trying to squeeze poem writing in to nap time or staying up late after my husband and baby had gone to bed.  I took a breather this past week and let the poems sit. (And got some physical exercise for the first time in awhile, yay!)

My plan now is to move ahead with editing and submitting the ones I think are worth saving, which means I will need to remove them from this blog site.  Journals and magazines that publish poetry usually want first publication rights, and the jury is out on whether blog posting is considered publishing.  So even though most of the poems here will not remain in their current form exactly, it’s still a good idea for me to take them down.

This means you have ONE MORE WEEK to read any of my 30/30 poems here and then I’ll be hiding them from view starting Sept 15th.  Tupelo Press will still have them archived at their site for the time being.

Thank you to everyone who has been following on this journey, particularly those of you who generously donated to Tupelo on my behalf – keep an eye out for a postcard from me soon.  It is not too late to contribute if you’re able, so please visit this site to make a donation and select my name from the August pull-down menu – I will continue to solicit donations for awhile yet.  Keep an eye out for information on my chapbook, Visitations, which will be available for preorder starting September 29th from Finishing Line Press. Exciting!

Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 30 – the grand finale!

Whoo, hoo, I’ve made it to the final day of the Tupelo Press 30/30 Project! I can hardly believe I’ve written so many new poems (and if I admit to cheating, a few drafts that got reworking).  Today’s last poem, Life of St. Cuthbert, Bede is from an illuminated manuscript illustration that I picked up at the British Museum’s Manuscript collection.

I would like to make another brief plea that if you’ve been following me at all this month and are able to give $5 or $10 to support the work that Tupelo Press does, and thereby support the literary arts, please submit on my behalf at their donation page.  Thank you for coming along on this journey with me!

Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 28 and 29 – last chance to give $!

Well, I’m almost done with this experiment and I’m feeling relatively pleased with my work on ekphrastic poems this week.  Today’s, “La Cathedrale, Rodin” and tomorrow’s, “Astronomer by Candlelight” are both up for your reading pleasure.

I would like to make another brief plea that if you’ve been following me at all this month and are able to give $5 or $10 to support the work that Tupelo Press does, and thereby support the literary arts, please submit on my behalf at their donation page.  Thank you for coming along on this journey with me!

“Detail of a Peacock” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 27

Today’s ekphrastic poem, “Detail of a Peacock” comes from a postcard of the Chora Church/Kariye Museum in Istanbul, which is recognized as one of the best-preserved and most beautiful collections of Orthodox Byzantine art in the world.  If you ever find yourself in Istanbul, GO THERE.  Because there is so much to take in and so many well-known stories depicted on the walls, I decided I’d do better to narrow my focus to just one decorative element, which is where this poem comes from.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!

“Untitled (Purple Petunia)” Tupelo Press Poetry 30/30 Project Day 26

Today’s ekphrastic poem derives from a postcard of Georgia O’Keeffe’s painting from 1925 titled “Untitled (Purple Petunia)“.  I saw the original in the O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, which is a lovely little gallery (I really like small art museums, especially those that house just one artist, like the Rodin in Paris).  Visiting that gallery a few years ago helped rejuvenate my viewing of O’Keeffe, who has been somewhat unfairly interpreted, if you ask me.  My poem today tries to wrestle with that.

As a reminder, the goal of this project is to help Tupelo raise money for it’s publishing endeavors.  If you are able, consider giving $5 on my behalf to help out.  Here is the link to their online donation system. Thanks!